Thursday, December 16, 2010

The Story of The Maya: Recording The Mysteries

In the late 1560s Fray Diego de Landa wrote of how Maya books, or codices, of “ancient matters and sciences” had been burned because they contained “superstition”. A more four codices survived, only one of which, the Grolier Codex, has remained in the Americas.

 
Maya codices are not books in the sense of having many leaves bound together along one edge. Instead, they consist of long strips of paper made from the bark of the fig tree, and are several feet long. Codices are folded in concertina fashion, much like a modern map, allowing a much of the book to be viewed at any one time as required. The paper was prepared with a layer of limewash on which the scribe painted.

Full article:

The Story of The Maya: Recording The Mysteries

by Mr Ghaz 
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Wednesday, December 15, 2010

The Mysteries of Vikings: The Giants, Dwarfs, and Monsters


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Human lived alongside gods, dwarfs, elves, monsters, and giants- and although the giants were defined in myth by their role as the god’s adversaries and eventual destroyers, relations between the two races were not exclusively hostile. There were, in facts, many liaisons between gods and giantesses.

Thor himself was born of the union between Odin and Jord, while Freyr and Freyja were the offspring of the Vanir god Njord and the giantess Skadi. Giants could even on occasion show kindness, as they did to the young prince Agnar, rightful heir to a kingdom that had been usurped by his brother; making his way to Jotunheim, Agnar found shelter and fair treatment of a kind that had eluded him in the human world.

Full article by Mr Ghaz :
The Mysteries of Vikings: The Giants, Dwarfs, and Monsters | Socyberty

The Myths and Legends of the Aztec World: The Holy Serpent

by Mr Ghaz:


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Tracing the distant origins of the great Plumed Serpent Quetzalcoatl as a primeval Mesoamerican fertility and storm deity provides evidence of the serpent’s associations with the sky and the sun. Scholars identify the twin-headed serpent represented in Aztec art and jewelry as an image of the wide sky. The snake also represented the burning power and generative force of the sun: the Aztec sun god Tonatiuh followed a fire snake, or xiuhcoatl, as he made his way across the sky by day. By night, when he had to endure a series of trials in the underworld, the sun fought off his adversaries using the xiuhcoatl as a trick. The solar fire snake became generally associated with physical strength: the Aztecs’ tribal god Huitzilopochtli, who was also a sun god, used a xiuhcoatl to dispatch his brothers and his elder sister the moon goddess Coyolxauhqui when he attacked them with typically martial vigor in the first minutes of his life.
The Myths and Legends of the Aztec World: The Holy Serpent

Thursday, December 9, 2010

Mysteries of Mesopotamia: The Medicine and Magic

by Mr Ghaz
Medicine and magic were inextricably linked in Mesopotamia, and both were also closely tied to divination. Sickness was generally thought of as punishment for some transgression, witting or unwitting, against the gods; alternatively, it could result from the actions of malicious demons like Lamashtu or through black magic.


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The first step in treating sickness was to work out what might have brought on the condition-a task for the baru-priest, or diviner. The various types of malady were associated with different supernatural forces, so a typical diagnosis might be “the hand of Ishtar,” “the hand of Shamash,” or “the hand of a ghost.” Whoever had because it was said to have “seized” the patient.

Full article:
Mysteries of Mesopotamia: The Medicine and Magic

The Mystery of Ancient Celts: Guardians of Sacred Lore

According to some classical sources, including Strabo and Caesar, it took a druid up to twenty years to learn everything he or she had to know-all without the aid of writing. Even in later centuries, storytelling from memory was a prized skill.

 
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 The Greek author Strabo and the Roman general Julius Caesar, among other classical observers; give long accounts of the role of the druids, who commanded the utmost respect among the Celts because they were the supreme guardians of the sacred lore. They were experts in divination and prophecy, as well as in the supervision of religious activities, such as ritual sacrifice at sacred lakes and groves. Celtic metalwork recovered from Llyn Bach in Anglesey, Wales, suggests that the site was a druid sanctuary, perhaps even the one referred to by Tacitus as the scene of the druids’ last stand against the Roman invaders of Britain. Druids were also required to memorize long and complex law codes and to give judgments on legal cases.

Full article:
The Mystery of Ancient Celts: Guardians of Sacred Lore | Relijournal
 Published by Mr Ghaz

Wednesday, December 8, 2010

Mysteries of Mesopotamia and Persia: A Demon-Plagued Universe

by Mr Ghaz:

 

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People actively sought the protection of those spirit beings they thought to be benevolent, doing so through prayers and offerings. However, many beings were fearsome-some owing to their natural malevolence and others because their mission was to punish erring humans for the sins that they had committed.
Most fearful of all was the dreaded Lamashtu, a demoness who specialized in killing babies in or out of the womb. In a culture with high infant mortality, it was natural enough that miscarriages, stillbirths, and cot deaths should be blamed on a malevolent spirit. Lamashtu was truly frightful in aspect: she had the head of a lion, asses’ teeth, naked breasts, a hairy body, blood-stained hands with claw-like like fingernails, and talons in place of feet. Besides snatching infants, which she did by slipping into the houses of pregnant women and touching them seven times on the belly, she was also a bringer of disease. People wore amulets for protection from her wiles; some also sought to buy her off with offerings, particularly of centipedes.
Full article:
Mysteries of Mesopotamia and Persia: A Demon-Plagued Universe

Tuesday, December 7, 2010

The Mystery of Celtic Cultural Legacy: Magic and Metamorphosis

by Mr Ghaz

 
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Metamorphosis, the ability to change shape or form, is a prominent motif in many Celtic tales, and examples are also to be found in Celtic art. The deer-like characteristics of the god Cernunnos-antlers and hooves-certainly suggest that shapeshifting between the animal and human worlds was believed possible, but images of this deity are among the handful of Celtic artifacts that actually attest to this. Other images imply a welding of human and animal essences rather than forms, as in the Gaulish statue of a war god who bears the image of a boar, a symbol of war and hunting, as an attribute (see illustration, opposite).
Full article:
The Mystery of Celtic Cultural Legacy: Magic and Metamorphosis

Sunday, December 5, 2010

The Mystery of the Crystal Skulls


image source
One of archaeology's most compelling mysteries is that of the 13 Crystal Skulls. Skulls have been one of the most powerful objects of symbolism in human history, all over the world. Several "perfect" crystal Skulls have been found in parts of Mexico, Central and South America. Together, they form a mystery as enigmatic as the Nazca Lines, the Great Pyramids and Stonehenge.
These skulls are believed to be between 5000 and 35000 years old. During early expeditions, archaeologists were told by locals that the skulls possessed magical powers and healing properties. However, people were unsure as to where they came from, or even why they existed. Some like to believe that these were remains from the lost civilization of Atlantis. Others like to believe these are fakes. And yet another group of psychics believe that these skulls have the capability to enable us to look into the past, present and future.
Historians and social anthropologists decided to find out more about the strange skulls. Very soon, they came across an ancient Indian legend saying that there had been thirteen crystal skulls of the Goddess of Death; they had been kept separately from each other under the strict control of pagan priests and special warriors.
Searches for more skulls started; some of them were found in museums and some in private collections not only in the USA, but in Mexico, Brazil, France, Mongolia, and in Tibet. There were more than 13 skulls found. However, not all of them were as perfect as the Mitchell-Hedges skull. Very likely, those were just later attempts to create something similar to the original skulls that were believed to have been gifts by God to the people.
The very construction and make of the skulls defies common logic. There are several crystal skulls in existence today around the world.

The most famous of all the crystal skulls is The Mitchell-Hedges Skull. Full story and video's:
Mystery of the Crystal Skulls

Thursday, December 2, 2010

The Wind Walker

Namaste and welcome to my campfire. I see that several have come to hear the story of the Wind Walker. Please help yourself to some food and drink; let your young ones sit close to my campfire so they may warm themselves by the heat of the fire.




Cover of The Brave [Region 2]

So here we are all together, we honor the Great Spirit as well as our ancestors. Those that once walked the earth long before our time, are here with us and they stand with us now.
Listen young ones, hear the whispers upon the wind. They call out to each of you bringing the messages from spirit to your ears and hearts. Let me relate to you the story of a young brave. He was a very special young soul. He carved himself a flute from the heart of an ancient cedar tree, which grew near our village. Some of the elders grew concerned, because he did not take part in the lessons being taught. He spent all his waking moments sitting and carving out his flute.


The Wind Walker
Full story by:   The Quail 1957  :
 The Wind Walker | Quazen